CLUB FOOT

Discussion in 'Shoeing Horses with Lameness Issues' started by Mikel Dawson, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. Offline

    Mikel Dawson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    43
    For those who read x-rays real well and VETS:

    The reason for the inquire is I've had a source tell me if it doesn't show up on an x-ray, then it is not club foot. True or False?

    Can club foot always be confirmed with an x-ray?
    My understanding a club foot shows the follow: higher in the heels; constricted hoof form(narrow); deep sole with the frog growing to ground: concave toe.

    I've also understood(correct me if I'm wrong) a club foot will be at least 3 degrees or more steeper than the "normal" hoof.
  2. Offline

    ray steele Administrator

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Mikel,

    I googled diagnosis of club foot,did not define,human or equine, 1st response. I read was that x rays were not necessary to diagnosis. Not sure about the " rules" used to define.

    Ray
  3. Offline

    Mikel Dawson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I've been working on a horse which I would classify as club foot: concave dorsal wall, narrower than the other hoof, when trimming, I only trim the heels, deep frog. Vet says it is not club foot because it doesn't show up on x-ray. I feel sorry for the customer, and I'm stuck in the middle. I just shoe the horse as if it is club foot.
  4. Offline

    Eric Russell Active Member

    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yes and no. According to Redden a grade 1 club foot is 5 degrees greater than the other foot.

    If you think it's a club foot and it has a dish. The only structure which can raise p3 to make it a club foot is the ddft. Why would you lower the heel and add excess force to the ddft to create a dish?

    Raise the angle to get rid of the dish. Then the vet will see it's a club foot via x-rays. You, vet, and horse will all be happy.
  5. Offline

    Mikel Dawson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Because after a shoeing period the heels have raised so much they must be lowered a bit.
  6. Offline

    Eric Russell Active Member

    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    43

    Results should override theory.

    Only trimming heel + dish at next shoeing = raised palmer angle next shoeing cycle (pretrim).

    Take a post trim x-ray and the next shoeing pretrim x-ray. If the palmer angle increased throughout the trimming the team will know there's a flexoral deformity.

    In my experience mild to midgrade clubs will have, basically, even toe/heel growth. Rood and Riddle and Redden both mention this. O'Grady lowers heels but adds to be careful of over loading the ddft. Savoldi is the only article I can find which suggests lowering the heel to prevent toe dishing. And he was obviously promoting his uniform sole thickness theory.
  7. Offline

    Mikel Dawson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Oh, believe me I understand, but when I can feel give in the sole in front of the frog, I'm not going to trim too much. I also understand there is a fine line to walk on how much to take. And the horse is telling me I am getting it pretty good, as it has yet to be sore after shoeing. I'd like to do the pics, but you know some owners, getting this done is like pulling hen's teeth. I do the best I can with what I got.
  8. Offline

    brian robertson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I think the deciding factor, on dealing with club feet, is whether or not the horse is in work and/or competing currently. if it's a pasture pet you can make it pretty; if this it's going to a show next weekend any change has to be subtle or you're in the dog house maybe fired
  9. Offline

    Mikel Dawson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yes, it is a fine line to walk. Here's my before and after pics. Before the RF angle was 51 degrees, after shoeing, it was 50.5. LF before was 47 degrees, after trimming was 49 degrees.
    I was surprised, the vet who checked this horse for sale said it was not club foot.

    Attached Files:

  10. Offline

    Eric Russell Active Member

    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    43
    It's certainly a club.

    I think it's best to look at the angles before trimming at the next shoeing. Trimming to add force to the ddft, navicular, tip of pedal bone, laminae keeps the banana shoers in business.

Share This Page

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)