Club Hoof Question

Discussion in 'Everyday Horseshoeing' started by Cassidy, Feb 25, 2014.

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    Cassidy New Member

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    What experience have you all had on clubbed hooved horses staying sound for work? What is your common support system, if any? jh.jpg Hanoverian Gelding

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    Mustang Before


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    Mustang After
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    Cassidy New Member

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    Work as in competition, etc.. not pony rides ;)
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    Bill Adams Active Member

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    They are all a bit different. Trim the hoof down to solid sole, shoe the foot as it needs. Keep the center of the coffin joint in the center of the shoe or a bit forward, with plenty of steel behind. Some do well with a wedge, some with a thick flat pad, some with just the shoe.
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    It's a long term, high maintenance horse. It will take some experimenting, to dial in exactly, what this horse needs and/or likes on its feet. The most important question really is, how talented the rider is? It's very difficult to keep these asymmetrical horses moving balanced and even.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    How old is the horse? Looks like he needs a shoe....
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    Cassidy New Member

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    Which horse?
    Both are sound for their current jobs barefoot. Of course both the owners and I will be monitoring them to ensure they get the support they need if it's needed in the future.

    My original questions were, what experience do you guys have with clubs being sound enough for work/competition?
    And what type of support do you all offer for your equine clients that have mix matched hooves?
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Are you a farrier?
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    Cassidy New Member

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    david a hall Moderator

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    What experience do you have with clubs being sound enough for work/ competition? And what type of support do you offer your clients that have club feet.?
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    Cassidy New Member

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    In my experience, it has to do with the severity of the club and the health of all of the hooves on effected horse. Generally the opposing hoof needs more attention when I get a call, because it has been over compensating. And while in work/competition the opposing hoof generally needs just as much, sometimes more support. Individual hoof weaknesses call for different support approaches, I realize that and I apologize for the broad question. Although I have experience, I acknowledge that I am still new to this profession compared to many others, particularly here, therefore I was/is interested in your feedback/experience/comments/etc. Thanks.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Do you feel asymmetric feet and club feet are the same thing?
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    david a hall Moderator

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    How are you defining support, I see you use it to refer to clients and feet? Try and explain what you are saying without using that word. Do you feel the contra foot is compensating or just effected by different forces?
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    Cassidy New Member

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    No, but a similar assessment on support should be done in some cases.
    I think whether acquired or congenital, a club hoof is more solidified AFTER a certain amount of time-if not dealt with appropriately right away.
    Asymmetry is always there (not usually noticeably) and can of course develop for a number of reasons, some can be helped to a degree.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Ok here is the deal, never use the word support, not here or in your truck! I have been a farrier for a long time and studied farriery science for 6 years and I have no idea of its meaning in farriery. I heard a vet use the phrase at least a dozen times about different pathologies on a horse today!!!!! There are more correct ways to describe rationales for a course of action.
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    Cassidy New Member

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    I appreciate your clarifying questions, and again I apologize for such a broad topic.
    I'm not sure if your asking me to list different ways to offer support? That list could be endless..
    Other hooves would be impacted by compensating if balance or support,etc was not ideal with the 1st hoof, causing discomfort.
    Other hooves would be effected by different forces (more commonly I find) because of poor balance or poor management.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    The hoof is a mirror image of the forces placed on it.
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    Cassidy New Member

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    I agree 100%. In my above response, even if the hoof was suffering because of overcompensating; it's still a result of more force.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Ok let's ban the word compensating, that's the one owners use. Why is one bigger and one smaller.
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    Cassidy New Member

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    Haha, okay.
    Poorly managed hoof care basically.
    Tall heels on club throwing hoof axis out of balance and resulting in toe jabbing and discomfort. Very poor quality/diseased frog , I think maybe tadpole would be a better descriptive word.
    The other hoof had excessive flaring, long toe and slightly weak heel from additional forces.

    He is now sound, big foot has tighter wall connection and much more upright growth - rather then bending forward from excess growth forces.
    Club hoof frog is much healthier, and heel has widened, but is still atleast 2.5/3 inches narrower (a few sizes smaller) then opposing hoof.
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    Mikel Dawson Active Member

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    Did you read Bill's post #3? They are all different. Depending on how much tension is in the DDFT will depend on how high the heel must be. Some need to stand normal, some need a little higher. Some need a shoe, some don't. In the famous words of a great farrier, "It Depends". It's a horse who will be high maintence.
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