1. Offline

    AnthonyLawrence Active Member

    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I found a piece of copper rod about 20mm diameter... Having heard that pit ponies were shod in copper years ago, I thought I'd have a crack at making one.

    Anybody done so and has some tips for working on copper?
  2. Offline

    chris bunting Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    63
    minimum heat if any at all , works easily , i would turn the bar whilst it is in its round section then forge into the required section
  3. Offline

    ray steele Administrator

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    63
    i ve found that copper work hardens and that every 8 to 10 hits requires bringing it up to a glow and
    letting it return to dull before hitting it again.

    ray
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • List
  4. Offline

    brian robertson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    43
    when the copper starts to "feel" hard under the hammer, reheat to dull red and quench in water(annealing); you can then work it cold or reheat to dull red. Without periodic annealing (water quench) you will develop internal cracks
  5. Offline

    AnthonyLawrence Active Member

    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Thanks guys.

    Tried annealling and hitting it cold... my elbow said, like... no way dude. So just heated to a glow an bashed it till it felt hard... it gave me quite a bit of time out of the fire really, more than steel.

    Anyway this is what I came up with, section finished 1" x 3/8" shoe 5 3/4" wide. Polished a bit to show the metal (and really highlight the faults) :(:p:p

    A piece of the original stock on the anvil.

    [IMG]
  6. Offline

    brian robertson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    43
    One of the old guys that shod the pony mules used in the local coal mine, told me that after forging the shoes; he w/striker would "pack" those shoes with a 1 1/2"x 1 1/2" flatter; basically work hardening them for better wear. Capewell sold speciality copper nails, just for the mining industry. He said that if the feet were dried out they would drive a steel nail first, pull it and replace with the copper nail; leaving any steel nails in would get you fired (probably an @ss kicking from the miners too); with the risk of methane/coal dust explosion. After the mules were in the mine for a while the feet were moist enough to use the copper nails exclusively.

    The Corunna mine produced a high grade low sulphur/low ash, coal first used by blacksmiths who switch from charcoal but then it was mainly used in steam locomotives and really ramped up production for the war effort and closed down after WW2 plus the introduction of diesel/electric locomotives
  7. Offline

    AnthonyLawrence Active Member

    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    28
    It was interesting to work with, could get quite used to it if there was ever any reason to use it... maybe some artistic stuff.
  8. Offline

    smitty88 Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    391
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I have shoes they used in the pits
    let me look up my photos if I cant find
    I will take pics of them in the forge tomoro
  9. Offline

    smitty88 Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    391
    Trophy Points:
    83
    copper shoe for pit ponies SS100826.JPG
  10. Offline

    brian robertson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Wow, English farriers stuck using unshapeable factory made cast copper shoes and Michigan shoers forging handmades for pit ponies. Makes my head hurt just thinking about it; there was something wrong with the Universe back then

Share This Page

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)