Diagnosed Navicular Syndrom

Discussion in 'Shoeing Horses with Lameness Issues' started by grimwood, Oct 17, 2013.

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    grimwood Member

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    I noticed a Grade 1 lameness when called out to trim this horse. The client did take my recommendation and take him to the vet for diagnosis. I could not be there but spoke with the vet afterwards. He diagnosed the gelding as Navicular Syndrom with a negative palmer angle. The horse has slightly contracted heels and atrophied frog on all four feet. I believe this was because his heels were stacked from neglect of hoof care prior to me seeing him. I thought it would be interesting to get everyones thoughts. p.s. I do not see a negative palmer angle. Looks acceptable to me.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Grimwood,

    what was the suggested Rx.

    thanks

    ray
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Couple of questions, What does the other foot look like, what sort of age is it and is it in work, out of work, retired from work never been in work?
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    grimwood Member

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    Trail horse about 10 years old. He recommended a rocker toe and wedge. He's in the pasture 24/7.


    Derek Grimwood
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Derek is he unridden? and just out of interest are the front feet a pair?
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    Jack Evers Active Member

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    Syndrome is not a Dx. Some years ago I heard a British vet speak on navicular. She called it "the last refuge of the diagnostically deficient." I do consider that palmer angle as low ( needs to be addressed) but not negative.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I to have heard that vet speak and have heard the same said about other conditions. Nether the less horses go lame and block to that area, personally I dont mind the term Navicular Syndrome but as you say Jack it isnt diagnosis . I expect the vet was looking at the ischemic holes and possible increase in density in the flexor surface of the Nav bone. Palmer angle looks ok to me id leave that as it is, but it looks broken back in pastern so maybe a wedge but not my favourite way of treating anything especially with a contracted paw like that has.
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    grimwood Member

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    Thanks for your opinions. I think everyone learns from having these discussions. Anyway, I put shoes on the gelding this evening and set him up in a 2 degree wedge and rocker toe. After the trim his angle was 55 degrees and his toe was 3 1/4 ". He trotted off sound and turned tight to the right without giving. However, when he was static he slightly pointed his right foot.

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    david a hall Moderator

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    Whats a rockered toe?
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    002.JPG 001.JPG


    "mild" rocker toe

    Regards
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Thats what I thought Rick :D Thanks.
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    Jack Evers Active Member

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    Sounds like you gave him what he needed. Good job.

    Just a peeve of mine (and I seem to be pretty much alone in being bothered, but I like good descriptions), those are #2 wedges. Although almost everyone (including vets) uses the term 2 degree, they are closer to 4 or 5 degrees. There are a few pads that truly are sold in degrees, but most are not and in most cases, the degrees are two to three times the number. I've never gotten an answer as to why this is done. I just checked some Castle Plastic bar wedges and the #2 and #3 wedges have the same angle (almost 5 degrees). The #3 is just a bit longer and wider for a bigger foot.
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    Do you call it something else across the pond?

    Regards

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