Flat sole and possible laminitis

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Sparkx2009, Jun 5, 2014.

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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    I am treating a horse that has a flat sole and abscesses under the two front hooves. I would like some advice on how I should treat the abscess. I am not sure if the horse has laminitis since I have no formal training and not accustomed to these conditions. If it is laminitis what should I look for.

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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks,

    I would suggest involving a veterinarian and or a farrier who is knowledgeable, if available, for the horses sake and your education.

    given the info you have provided, i would ask how you determined that the abscesses are present? what symptoms make you suspect/question laminitis?



    Regards

    Ray
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    We don't have much farriers here where I am from. There are about 4 farriers and they cannot say for sure that it is laminitis. The horse has some red sore like spots under the hooves and the sole of the hoof is flat and soft in a few areas.

    I just started taking care of the horse and did not take any pictures.

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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks,

    sorry ,i can t help, with so little info i d be doing long distance ....guessing, at best, and i think most everyone else would also,

    please provide description of your observations , how the horse stands, heat in the hooves? reaction to testers if available, how the horse walks, etc., some kind of info.

    Ray
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    Who has been caring for the horses feet? Google laminitis for symptoms. Do you have any pictures? Also where are you from? I agree with Ray, 1: you need a professional opinion. 2: You haven't provided enough information for anyone to even form an opinion. Tell/show us more, please.

    Regards
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    The horse came to Antigua from St. Kitts and I do not get a chance to take any pictures yet. The horse stands properly on all fours but he walks tenderly. He started cantering without any problem and wants to run off with the jockey. I will try and get some more information asap.

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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks

    My man, now you have given a very small amt. of info. . I /we do not have crystal balls, well i think that I do but that is a whole nuther discussion................ information is the key!

    Ray
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Was this horse recently trimmed? How long ago was the journey?Is the ground surface different from your island and the island that it came from? Feed change? How was he/she, used, how is he/she now used?

    Again,aside from some red marks what makes you suspect abscesses and or laminitis?

    Regards

    Ray
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    The horse came to Antigua about 2 months ago and the track surface is different. The surface is better where the horse came from. It was trimmed about two weeks ago. The feed is different he used to be fed with a lot of sweet feed and molasses. He is being used for racing.

    The amount of sweetness that the horse used to get, the flatness and the bad spots under the hooves are the reasons why I am wondering if it's laminitis.

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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    Ok, here's what I see in my crystal ball, in which I have absolutely no confidence. The horse is an over fed thorobred with typical TB thin flat soles that have been over trimmed. Laminitis or abcessing may or may not be present. A professional examination is required. Laminitic horses typically avoid cantering, but will if they feel they have to, much to their detriment. (Edit to add: Hell, they typically try to avoid even walking, depending on the degree of laminitis )

    Regards
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Sparx treat this as a resource, post us some pics and we. Will try and help..
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks,

    any update on this horse?

    thanks

    ray
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks,

    tell me what you re seeing ,in the hoof , how the horse moves,stands, etc. and what you ve done to this point please.thanks

    ray
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparks,

    given that you do not provide any other info when asked , my amateur consideration of what the horse presented has for a problem is..........a boo boo towards his toesy.

    hope this helps

    ray
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    Presently I took the shoes off the horse and he has problem walking and is putting lots of weight on the hind legs. I am thinking of leaving him and letting the hoof grow down a bit and see if it makes it easier for him. It would probably give the hoof time to harden and heal. He is a heavy horse and the track has a few stones on it which might be his major problem.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparkx,

    with your description,

    i would suggest ,if you can apply a shoe, incorporate a hospital plate bolted/attached to the ground side of the shoe and if possible incorporate a frog support between the plate and the frog. this would provide relief to the hooves and support and allow you to monitor the progression.

    because i could not see the trimmed toe or the outside of the hoof capsule ,i can t make any guesses on anything else.

    ray
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    Sparkx2009 New Member

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    We do not have those types of shoes. Any shoes other than racing plates would have to be ordered. Would you suggest using a leather pad under the shoe for support.
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    If you can't make shoes yourself then your options for helping the horse are very limited unless you have a huge inventory of every conceivable type of shoe in many different sizes.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Sparkx,

    a leather pad may give some relief, or it may not, not trying to be funny, it is just prescribing via the internet without actual being hands on is quite difficult when trying to help out so expect a lot of vague answers, but a lot of suggestions for you to evaluate. You may want to try a leather rim pad to the hoof and a leather or plastic full pad to the shoe,so that the rim can give some height to the wall and keep the sole from loading to the ground. Remember when the leather gets wet and or used it will stretch and eventually be right next to the hoof.

    can you make steel or al. shoes yourself? you probably can,

    if your supplier does not keep simple keg /premade shoes in stock consider acquiring approx 30 inches of al. 3/8 x 3/4 or 1 inch, it can be worked cold and I m guessing if left in the sun in your part of the world it would bend even easier but still not hot enough to burn it up. Shape it up, get some nail holes in it, we won t discuss nail hole making methods here but if you read some other posts, you ll see that there are a # of ways to make a usable hole, then drill and tap for a plate.

    regards

    Ray

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