Jammed up coronary bands

Discussion in 'Everyday Horseshoeing' started by Christos Axis, Jun 12, 2012.

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    Christos Axis Member

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    These are pictures of hooves from 3 different horses. Very strong hooves, never showed any sign of weakness. But the distortion on their coronary bands puzzles me, I do not know what causes it, how to correct it or whether it is a problem at all.

    It seems to be irrelevant to the shoes, they get this even when barefoot for a long time or shod for a long time. It may appear when they are barefoot and disappear when they are shod or the other way around, appear when they are shod and disappear when they are barefoot.

    It also seems to be irrelevant to the positioning of the clips. They get it and it goes away in all clipping styles. Unclipped, toe clipped, quarter clipped.

    Any thoughts ?

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    Gary Hill Active Member

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    I go by the old saying, "If it isn't broke don't fix it.":cool:
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    aliciathompson Member

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    I am inclined to float the area that is jammed. I will admit the small gap at shoe level doesn't please me but coming back to smooth relaxed hairlines is pretty nice. I will fill the gap with hoof putty and generally after the first few cycles I no longer have the issue.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    I was thinking to float the quarters too, Alicia, but was worried that the nails will come loose if the floated quarter comes down to meet the shoe. No ?

    Doesn't filling the gap with putty cancel the effect of the floated quarters ? Is the putty you use somehow flexible ?
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    aliciathompson Member

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    I never have issues with the nails coming loose.

    To be honest now that you say that I am not sure why it doesn't happen but for what ever reason it never has been an issue so I just keep doing what has worked.
    The putty I use is kerratex hoof putty and it is wax so is easily displaced as things settle.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    That's interesting, Alicia, thanks. I'll probably give it a try in the next couple of days with the horse in the first picture, he's forging a little bit and can use an early reset for the needs of our discussion.
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    Clint Burrell Active Member

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    Float the area in question on the foot/feet then drop it and work on the other feet. Come back to the feet in question and see how they look. Results can be fairly quick sometimes.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I would angle the cutter handles out a bit to start. The outer jaw just slightly lower than the inner jaw. I never float anything ever, but it seems that a flare can be reduced altering the plain of the cutters. Just a thought. not so radical either.
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    aliciathompson Member

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    Never tried that. Sounds interesting.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    You can do some amazing leveling tricks like that. With the lads I get them to imagine a line that bisects the cutter handles, and to keep that line perpendicular to the hoof being trimmed, If you have a long toe then move that line away if you have low heel move that line in. In Christos foot its hard to work out whats high and whats low at the coronary band, I would suggest a little of both.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    I'll try that, Clint, thanks. The results don't have to be very quick, with my rhythm the hoof will have time to remodel and may be even grow a bit.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    I don't quite get how and what exactly to do, David, can you please explain some more ?
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Angle the cutter handles out if the area of the foot is long or flared, inwards if the foot is straight or low.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    Ok, got that. And then, with rasping and burning, I suppose I maintain that effect and not rasp and burn it flat, correct ?

    PS: I know this feels like a dentist's everyday routine instead of a farrier's, sorry about that.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Indeed. you will enjoy the science behind it when you get your brain round it. But often less is more so make subtle changes. you can get the same effect by lifting your back hand when rasping.
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    Christos Axis Member

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    Sure I will, David, thanks for the help and the patience. I'll try it in the next couple of days, if I manage any good pictures to show the effects I'll post them.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    Dont apologies, you ask questions and everyone gets something out of it, even if its a disagreement, it stimulates thought. Try it tomrow and come back with what you think.
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    Karen Fletcher Active Member

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    That's the same exact thing that Bruce Matthews told me when he came to look at my horse!
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Huh? The only time I have a back hand is when I'm playing tennis. o_O
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    I would have guessed your sense of humor would have earned you a good number of backhands.:ROFLMAO:

    Regards

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