Opinion needed on possible purchase

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Mitypenny, Apr 25, 2014.

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    Mitypenny New Member

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    We have found a pony we are considering buying but she has some cracks at the toe of both fronts and a quarter crack on the inside rear. We would like to keep this pony barefoot. Can she be corrected and maintained with just regular balanced trims or will it require shoeing or ?? In your opinion, can they be corrected or should we pass on this one? Thanks! image.jpg

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    david a hall Moderator

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    Very tricky to comment on the horse without it in front of you. It appears to have white line disease (seedy toe) the cracks are a consequence.. Good management will help and poor management will increase the chance of infection. Your best plan if it is possible is to get the person who will be looking after it's feet to look at it in person. If that person is a farrier it would be better because they could comment with an experience of shoeing as well.
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    It looks like these feet could probably be managed and maintained back to good health with proper and continuous care. Totally agree with David's statement.

    Regards
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    There is no problem we cannot solve with a suitable application of cash. If you're going to make a purchase choice based on the cost of shoes vs. barefoot, you probably can't afford the animal.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I didn't read that in there post Tom.
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Seems that is what it was all about, David.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    to answer as direct to your questions as i possibly can:

    I cannot give an answer based on the info provided. I hope you understand,

    My suggestion on the other hand would be similar to Davids.

    Regards

    Ray
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Nothing to cry about, though.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    If by that Tom you mean if it's the perfect horse in every other way buy then I'd agree...
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    Mitypenny New Member

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    Thank you all for replying. I completely understand. To clarify, my farrier has a conflict as the seller is also a client so thought you all might be able to help. Cost is an issue but not affordability. This is a backyard pony...not an A circuit show animal. I am not willing to spend more on farrier work than the pony is actually worth. I understand there are many variables but do you think this (especially the rear quarter) can be corrected with balanced trims (or shoes for a short amount of time)? Do you think the cracks could indicate underlying bone changes or previous founder? Am I worrying too much? Basically, I am interested in what your course of action would be? Then, I can make my own choice on how much cash I am willing to apply. The pony appears presently sound. Thank you all again for any insight you can offer. I have included a couple more photos.
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    Stef Member

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    Hi Mitypenny,

    I have just spend a lot of time on my post - and deleted it. So I will make it short and this is just my opinion and it might offend you. Don't buy a horse. A backyard pony deserves the same basic care as a show animal - I am not talking about over-the-top-high-end-whirlpool/acupuncture/herbal teas-for-horses-treatments ect but good, basic care. And part of this care is hoof care. If you have to calculate already costs of trimming vs. shoeing for a horse than you might be better off without any horse... Sorry.
    Just my 2 cents worth.
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    Mitypenny New Member

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    Hi Stef, No offense taken but I think you are not following what I am asking. I agree with you. A backyard horse/pony does require the same care as the show animal. I am a horse owner. I have been for almost 30 years. I have only backyard horses who get regular scheduled farrier and vet care. My horses are part of my family. One I have owned for twenty-two years and the other for 11. They are both sound and healthy with great feet. I don't buy horses lightly and then sell/dispose of them once they don't fit my needs. I know of many who would buy this pony with its problems and work it as long as it's sound and then haul it to auction once it can no longer work. That's not me. If I purchase this pony, it would most likely have found it's forever home. However, I am not a rescue that can take in all. I don't have the room. Therefore, I ask the questions I do so I know what I am getting into before I make the commitment. I have experience managing a horse with the toe crack/seedy toe/white line disease in the past. It took over a year to completely grow out with no reoccurrence. Most of that time the horse was shod. The quarter crack is new to me though. It makes me nervous. I won't knowingly buy something that will cause me heartache or drain me just as I wouldn't buy one with navicular or one needing repeated hock injections. I ask the questions I do because I do care and am picky about my horses feet. I am unfamiliar with it and just not sure if the repair is a big process or not. We are not talking about routine maintenance on an animal with good feet. I am asking what would be involved to completely heal it. I'm just trying to make an informed decision.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    [quote="Mitypenny, post: 29355, me I'm just trying to make an informed decision.[/quote]


    If future possible costs are a deal breaker then I would suggest that you walk away now..........but realize that a perfectly manicured pony could/can develop the same problems and will need to be dealt with.

    From the presentation I don t see anything drastically wrong and might improve with regular hoof care.

    If it is a good pony for your intended rider, get it, and deal with the hoof situation as you go,

    good ponys are tough to find,

    Regards

    Ray
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    From the looks of the pictures, you plan on taking better care of the pony than the current owner. A good trim on a regular schedule will probably solve most of the current issues. By the way, that is not a true quarter crack, LOL it is a crack at the quarter, . A true quarter starts at the coronary band, is caused by an imbalance, and goes down. That crack starts at the ground surface, and appears to be a result of a weaker section in the hoof, originating from an old trauma at the coronary band, and cracking/chipping at the ground surface due to overgrowth, at some point. Notice how it "looks" like the crack runs the full length of the wall, but has not separated ? With regular care, it probably never will. If you like the pony, and that is the worst problem it has, you should probably buy it.

    Regards

    I don't understand why there is a conflict for the farrier. All he needs to do is tell you the truth. That shouldn't be a problem for him or the owner.

    Regards
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    Jack Evers Active Member

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    What Rick said - the fronts are not a problem, the rear is likely not a problem.

    Just an aside to farriers, please don't try to psychoanalyze the OP, just answer the question or ignore it.
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Based on the additional photos, it appears that the pony is over due for service. 'nuther words whatever care it has been getting may be regular, but not as often as it should be. So I would ask the farrier 2 simple questions; What if the pony was trimmed more often? And, will you be able to deliver service more often?

    I don't see where getting answers to those questions would present a conflict of interest for the farrier.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    The crack in the quarter is quite superficial, not to dismiss it but regular trimming should keep the foot tight and prevent winging that looks like a possible cause. It is possible that at some time his feet were allowed to get all out of shape and caused the splits. It shows no typical signs of founder.. And bone changes would require X-rays not our opinions... If it's a good pony have it. Old age will get it before those feet do.
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    Stef Member

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    Hi Mitypenny,

    Thanks for clearing that up - I can totally understand your point now. Just sounded to me that you would not buy the pony because of $40 US for a trim vs $120 US for shoeing. And I apologize that I have gotten a bit off topic before - just have seen too many horrible things here in my area because people want to save a few bucks which might have made me a bit too sensitive ;-)
    Won't comment on the feet as a lot of great people with many years of experience have given you already great advice and due to my lack of expertise (Tom, is that spelled correct? ;-)).
    Good luck with the pony!

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