uses of the patten shoe

Discussion in 'Shoeing Horses with Lameness Issues' started by DeniseMc, Aug 6, 2013.

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    DeniseMc Member

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    and logic. Why would, or how could, a patten shoe be used for all the uses I have read about it being used for: 1) severed deep flexor tendon 2) bowed tendon (which is usually the superficial flexor) and 3) DSLD. Don't the mechanics of each contradict the use of a patten in at least two of the three cases?
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Where have you read about these "off label" uses? ;)
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    Rick Burten Professional farrier

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    Yes. Besides, nothing applied to the bottom of the hoof is going to help a horse with DSLD/ESPA.
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    When they come out of this, a splint, after surgery; set 'em down and see what happens.....I make mine to be reduced over time. Give us, Denise, a detailed description of how the a tendon is made up, how they work; the cable within a cable within a cable would be a good start.......

    flex splint.jpg


    flex shoe.jpg


    flex 2.jpg
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    DeniseMc Member

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    DeniseMc Member

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    Plenty of good reference books out there.
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    WOW!:LOL:

    Typical(y)
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    DeniseMc Member

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    I could have shared my knowledge of tendons, fascia, ligaments etc., but first hand experience with Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, tendon tears etc. is a much better lesson learned and not easily teachable..
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    DeniseMc Member

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    http://www.equipodiatry.com/dsld.htm
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    Why didn'it ya?Comparative anatomy is a part of the game. How does one communicate to a or customers when a vet dialectics "ten dollars words" in a 'script' for one or us to follow....;)
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    Draftshoer Active Member

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    IMG_20130618_133333.jpg
    This horse (percheron) was bearing his weight on his toe. His heels weren't even touching the ground. The attending vet and I decided a Patton shoe would allow the horse to bear weight over the whole hoof. It has worked wonderfully. The horse is now able to walk quite comfortably. I used stacked aluminum bar stock to raise the heels. IMG_20130618_133333.jpg IMG_20130618_093101.jpg IMG_20130618_133348.jpg
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    Did ya know that palpation with hoof testers on the medial heel of one foot, of the hind, will indicate high suspensory lamness at or near the origin(nerve block will adjudicate). ..... palpation to the medial hind suspensory, just under the medial point of the hock will indicate a"kick in the back of the leg" when lameness is present. I don't have write a paper; empirical experiences....
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    DeniseMc Member

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    I do know when you try to take stress off one structure you likely end up overstressing another; so ending up with two sore, injured areas is twice as bad...
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    DeniseMc Member

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    I remember Justin Decker talking about this after your one clinic from several years ago. Anatomically, I still can't figure out why this would be?
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    But dear, you didn't expound on your knowledge for "Us All" to learn. It is not "Inter Web Trap" here. I learn from all; I can't read and experience what others have learned; read or been through. So, give us your "learned experiences" explaining the make up of tendons, whether "comparative anatomy or learned"....
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    DeniseMc Member

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    According to two of the websites I posted above, the patten (or Patent shoe if you prefer, lol) takes the weight bearing off the injured leg and puts it on the "good leg". So now you're saying your use of the patten shoe allows weight bearing over the whole hoof on the injured leg. This is getting interesting....
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    Me either! I do miss Justin's "coming of age"!
    It is just what I have,had, learned dealing with the hind end suspensory cases for over 27 years.:confused:
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    Mr. Perry Active Member

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    Now you are getting to some S**t. bilateral, contra-lateral and ispsilaterad lameness-es. Simple, injury, support the bi-lateral foot. Putty, pour and or heart bar, depending on acquired knowledge..
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    Draftshoer Active Member

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    This particular horse was only using his toe when he would put weight on that leg. His heels were about two inches off the ground when the leg was bearing weight. I should also clarify that he was basically just using his bad leg as a crutch to move his good leg. Basically what I did by using the Patton shoe was provide a way for his heels to contact the ground and thus bear weight over the whole hoof instead of just the toe.

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