Other Evaluate exrays?

Discussion in 'Farrier Advice For Horses With Lameness Issues' started by Rocksie, Jan 12, 2014.

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    Rocksie Member

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    Thanks, Gary. Yes, that's a good description and pointing out the nail that marks the spot makes it obvious. I looked up COA online after your first post too, and found a site that Ronald Aalders had contributed to. Hooves and Horses, easy to follow descriptions and 'on fire for knowledge'. Good place, I thought.
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    Rocksie Member

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    Chester 004sized.jpg
    Chester 001sized.jpg Chester 003sized.jpg


    Right front.
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    did you buy this horse with these issues or did they occur after you bought him?
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    Rocksie Member

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    I bought the horse sight unseen from a horseman I know with an eye for a good horse, who had him vetted prior to purchase. His feet were so long and so run forward when he arrived, I couldn't believe he had been running up to a few days before I got him.

    I looked at the bottom of his feet before his first set was nailed on, and when he got his second and third set too, because I wanted to see the progress in getting his heels back where they belonged. I also had a problem with uneven walls that I wanted the shoer to address, so I've seen the bottom of his front feet barefoot at each shoeing, and did not see this separation at his heel until I pulled his shoes a couple of days ago. So, the answer to your question is that the problems you see in the photos occurred after I bought him.
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    I would suggest you take this horse to a shoer that has a lot of experience with TBs, not necessarily a plater , this horse has more issues than most. These problems are not insurmountable; it's just going to be a long haul.
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    Rocksie Member

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    What do you see as his issues, Brian? What would your plan be for him?

    All the shoers here, on the track, shoe 90% Thoroughbred, I'd guess. A few running Quarterhorses, and a pony horse here and there. Lots of experience with the breed, in other words.
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    somebody really robbed this horse's feet. he has insufficient sole depth, toes rasped away, frogs overly trimmed, poor digital cushions,wall separations, asymmetry improperly addressed, coffin bones look pretty beat up, possible past laminitic incidents in the past

    This horse mainly needs more hoof mass under him, not out in front of his legs. Barshoes with frog support or heartbars with pour in pads. Maybe with a rim pad too. But the key is to have the shoes placed properly under COA. Might have to have glue ons for a few cycles to get his walls in better shape. Wouldn't hurt to get him in a drier environment too.
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    Rocksie Member

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    Thanks very much for that, Brian. Yes, his toes are rasped away, but what confuses me is that they are still too long and I can't see how to fix that. With shallow sole depth as well, do you just nail the shoe where it should be, with the toe hanging over the front?

    His feet are wet once a day, when I wash them out after picking them.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie Member

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    His stride shortened, his feet were warm, and he would stand in his stall like he was trying to unweight his heels. He also would take a step here and there that caused him to act like he had stepped on something sharp. At times, he would also have a strong pulse. He didn't react to hoof testers though. He has no other heat or filling in joints higher up.

    Thanks for joining in, Ray. The more eyes the better.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I can see a nail in the heel. The general coffin joint area can be sore from this type of hoof set up. You can shorten the toe and have them float off.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    May I suggest that you tape some cushioning on to his hooves, two or three thicknesses of face cloth folded smooth, some styrofoam, even three thicknesses of corrugated cardboard, enough of something to provide a cushion. and walk him on the same type of surfaces that you believe you saw his discomfort. If you choose to try this depending on your findings ,it will help to narrow down a protocol suggestion . I find pictures of hooves difficult to make suggestion from and x rays to be often a page in the book.

    I 100% agree that this animal needs better hoof care,ie trim and shoeing over all and believe that with a little more looking you can find a very competent farrier in your area.

    Ray
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    Rocksie Member

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    Haha! I see the nail now too! How could I have missed something that obvious?:)

    You can shorten the toe and have them float off?
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    Rocksie Member

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    I'll do that, Ray. Thanks.
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    gary evans old and slow

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    I think david is referring to the way the horse moves after you have shortened the toe...
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I was thank you Gary.
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    Rocksie Member

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    Oh, good grief. Thanks, Gary. I thought the toes were going somewhere.

    David, the "toe is rasped away", "insufficient sole depth", "broken back axis". I haven't figured out what to do because it sounds like I can't take any heel, or the coffin bone will be flatter still. The exray shows toe flare, and visually the toe looks long, but it's rasped back to white line and looks like I can't take any off from the bottom either. Then also anything I do is going to thin the sole more it seems. What to do?
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    Rocksie Member

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    Ray, I taped three layers of cardboard on this morning. I don't think it had an impact.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie,

    if you can come by some pieces of wood, firm plastic or th like, approx. 1/4 inch thick, 1 or so inch wide, by 6 inches to 10 inches long, wood lathe works well, these can by used to change angles without a lot,if any expense.
    if this horse stand to be worked on well, try placing a "stick under the hoof, across the heels, so that when the hoof is on the ground, weight bearing is increased in that area, observe what the horse does, , come right off, settle on it and stay , shift more weight over, etc. . continue replacing this stick on the sides, toe, and over the frog, and observe. If you find that the horse seems to "like a positioning", by that settles in , try picking up the opposing hoof.

    as to your question about the Castle frog support pad, it is a good product used correctly.

    Ray
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    Rocksie Member

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    That sounds interesting. This is a really smart and cooperative horse, so I'll see what he tells me. Thanks, Ray.

    Do you think it's possible to glue the frog pad in place, or are shoes a must for keeping it on?

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