Other Evaluate exrays?

Discussion in 'Farrier Advice For Horses With Lameness Issues' started by Rocksie, Jan 12, 2014.

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    ray steele Administrator

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    If you try the lathe or something like it ,let us know how you placed the pressure/lift and your read of the reaction.

    I suppose they could be glued in place but I can tell you that the pad will need to be very well cleaned to remove the silicone mold release that is used in the molding process . The pad will be urethane so you will need a glue that is compatable.

    one of the pictures posted looks like the hoof has been trimmed, would you have another view along the lines of the initial pictures of the shod hoof/ves?



    Ray
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    gary evans old and slow

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    use vet wrap
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    Rocksie Member

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    Thanks, Gary. I was thinking of something that would last longer than vetwrap, but not as long as shoes. I'll probably go with vetwrap and duct tape anyway, because I've got those items. I haven't had much luck finding glue that works on plastic in the past.
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    Rocksie Member

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    I did the wood lath tests today, Ray. He willingly settled on almost every part immediately and didn't hesitate to lift his other foot. The only time he wanted to move his foot off the lath before he picked up the other foot was when I positioned it from the tip of his frog straight out through the middle of his toe.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie,
    just a couple more questions,

    have the hooves been trimmed since the original pictures ?, after the xrays, the pics with he plates attached are what i m calling the original. if so, do you have after trim pictures , could/would you post them?

    because it had plates on i m presuming that it had been raced or was intended to be raced, i m trying to get an idea of how hard the animal was run previous to,or leading up to the pictures and the xrays.

    as to the frog support pad and vet wrap, a simple crushing of a mostly used roll or the forming of some used vet wrap can be fashioned ino a temporary frog support shape quickly and easily.

    hanks

    ray
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    Rocksie Member

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    Hi Ray,

    The horse ran at the end of November. He came out of the race fine, but I didn't think he looked good during the race. I had the shoer put Silver Queen XT's on him November 10, hoping to get his breakover point closer to where it belonged. With the toe already taken off back to white line, he didn't think it could be shortened at that point and neither did I.

    Middle of December I had him changed back to regular shaped shoes thinking he may not like the square toes. The shoer barely touched him with the rasp, so no length or balance was changed at that appointment. Because of the those growth rings, he thought the horse had rotated coffin bones causing his stubbier way of going. I wanted the jammed coronet on his left foot fixed, but he had 'never heard of that' and didn't look at what I was talking about so it stayed.

    I had the exrays done the end of December to see if he was right about the rotation, and to guide his next shoeing. I was relieved to see the pictures, but they were not effective on the shoer. That's when I started trying to find all the guys who used to be at horseshoes.com.

    I pulled his shoes and did some rasping just to keep him from breaking up a lot. That's where he's at now.

    This horse is an honest warrior, despite terrible attention to his hooves. He still likes his job so I look forward to seeing what he can do with proper hoof care and comfortable feet under him.

    Thanks, Ray. I'll get more pictures this morning.

    R
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie,

    Would you mind letting me know(either here or by PM) where in Oregon you are located, I ll do my best to get you the names of some farriers in that area that are capable of assessing your horses hooves. I say this because I ve not gotten any info from the weight bearing exercise that would allow me to suggest an idea, except the horse need a good trim 1st. by a good competent farrier, shoer , trimmer or iron hanger.

    Ray
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    Rocksie Member

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    Rocksie Member

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    Chester 005.jpg
    This area has a slope to it, with the higher side on the left. It was windy today, and he just felt too good to try to get pictures out on the road. Yikes. Especially with the metal roof on the barn sounding like it was coming off, everyone was in an uproar from time to time.

    His toes are just buffed off from the wood chips under the walker.
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    Clint Burrell Active Member

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    Farrier to owner suggestions;

    Lay horse off. While laid off, get the feet balanced, put on a set of plain steel shoes w/ rim pad. Pack feet w/ Magic Cushion. Do this a couple of cycles at minimum. Feet need gathered up and some depth.

    Best bet is to find someone off track. Feet aren't going to improve very easily w/ plates on. If you find someone that can improve the feet for you, have them plate the horse as well. A horseshoer can plate racehorses but a plater can't necessarily shoe horses. One thing to note, horseshoers generally cost more than platers. Best of luck.
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    Rocksie Member

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    Thanks, Clint. He is laid off, and I'm hoping he'll be ready to go back to training in May. And dang, Big Dee's had Magic Cushion on sale for 33 bucks, or so, recently and I didn't buy it.

    If you have time, what's the difference between platers and shoers other than the shoe, and nothing hanging out beyond the heel?

    Ray, NW Oregon. I could haul him for a good job too.
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    Clint Burrell Active Member

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    Difference between platers and horseshoers.

    Platers shoe primarily on track only using steel shoes on occasion for pony horses. Most don't carry an anvil or forge. They also are used to shoeing young horses that are well fed and have a short attention span. This makes speed much more important and there may be some things left to be desired in the quality of the shoeing.

    A "Horseshoer" can generally handle most anything put in front of them. If not they know well enough to refer to someone that knows more or specializes.

    As a note, originally I was being a bit facetious and my experience is based on 20yr old knowledge. Things may have changed a bit since.;)
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    Rocksie Member

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    Facetious is easy to miss in type, isn't it?:) Thanks the clarification, Clint. As another note, your 20 year old experience pretty much matches current activities on the track, as far as I can tell.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Clint,

    in your experience, do you think that pictures in post #12 of this thread are common for race track work? plater or otherwise?

    I ll start another thread so as not to derail this one if necessary.

    Rocksie, I guessing then that your somewhere in the Portland area, I m asking so that ,when I m at the Summit next week , I can give as much geographical info when asking about farriers in that area.

    Ray
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I think they look better in those last pics
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    Rocksie Member

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    That's right, Ray, not too far from Portland. Where is the Summit being held? Thanks so much for your help.

    I'll give my 2 cents on your question to Clint on race track work, at least where I'm at. I can only think of one farrier here that went to school for the job, and that was 46 years ago. He does nice clinches, almost always leaves one heel longer than the other, and too much toe. The other three I've used in the past leave far too much toe. One so much so that the horse he did for me forged every step from the first day it was shod. There was a time that it was commonly thought that long toes, by delaying breakover, would lengthen a horse's stride and make him a better runner by doing so. The notion has been debunked for many years, but old habits die hard, especially when there is no continuing education in the profession. Also, finish work does not look like a priority here for anyone. To be fair, if I could get the foot right, I'd be happy, so nice finishing isn't a huge concern to me either.

    I've seen the work on horses that ship from bigger, higher end racetracks in Cali, and have yet to see anything less than heinous. Most of the horses I've paid attention to though came from one particular recognizable name trainer down there and apparently he has a terrible farrier. I find that amazing, and I really don't understand it.

    David, thank you! I trimmed him a little when I pulled his shoes.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie,

    the Summit is in Cincinnati,Ohio.

    i ll ask some local farriers and dealers for a couple of names and pass them on to you in a pm

    Ray
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    Clint Burrell Active Member

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    Ray,

    I'd say it's not "uncommon". Though I think most work has gotten better "looking" in the last ten years.

    Most track work falls under the supervision/discretion of the trainers. Regardless the quality of the horses or owners wallet, the cheaper a trainer can get farrier work done coupled with how much an owner can be billed tends to pay dividends for said trainer. Also note that many of the trainers I've dealt with were more ignorant about feet than the lay veterinarian. They all knew how to blister one though.:rolleyes:

    Now lets move on to the farriers. Some were young, getting a start and more easily influenced by trainers. These were inexperienced and either had no concern for how horses moved, didn't care or (most likely) couldn't comprehend. Others were related to the trainer and all the above. Most didn't have to worry about how good or poor of a job they did because they were moving in 6-8 weeks anyway and next year there would be a whole new crop.

    Couple this with a bunch of young horses that may or may not have had their feet worked with the first 2 years of their lives and your not going to attract the quality of farrier that should be present in such a demanding sport/discipline.

    If I were to go back to the track I would only shoe allowance and aged claimers.;)

    I'll stop there cause this could be conversed about for hours.
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Thanks Clint

    ray
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    Well Clint, that surely brought up some ugly 40 yr old memories....

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