Reasonable Prices for Horseshoeing

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by ray steele, Mar 14, 2014.

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    shoe'em Member

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    That sounds like SCUM thinking. SCUM is an acronym for: Socialism, Communism, and/or Unmitigated Marxism.
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    gary evans old and slow

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    Just in case you missed the irony - David is about as far from that demographic as you could get...
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I did laugh when I read his post Gary!
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    shoe'em Member

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    Glad to hear that!
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    appaloosa 64 New Member

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    Unfortunately no owners have replied to this post? :unsure: Depending on where you are and the mindset of the people owning horses has a lot to do with price of farrier costs. 20 years ago any saddle horse would go through our local auction and bring $1700.00 minimum. Shoes all around were $65.00. (Meat Prices where high also). Now unless the horse is extremely well broke you might see $3000.00 but the average would be a $1000.00 or less. I have to charge $120.00 for a basic shoe, $40.00 a trim just to make ends meet. I wish I could charge 25% more but I do not think that would go over so well:(

    Rob
    Dawson Creek, BC
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    appaloosa 64 New Member

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    Hello everyone, no one seems to have a reply to my last post. Here is an update as one of the local auctions had a ranch horse sale and the top horse was $12,000, next $8,500, good for the horse industry in our area. The problem in the Peace River area with the oil & gas income that I see too often is they spend $60,000 on the trailer, $60,000 on the truck to pull it, saddle, tack & specialty feed additives unlimited. Unfortunately the feed (hay), paddock space ( stole that from the fellows across the big water), hoof care are the last of their worries. No feet, no horse, was what I always was taught. It starts with feed, minerals and overall careo_O
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    Josh Ramsey Member

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    I think sometimes a farrier has to take s hard look at his business/Cheyenne clientele and see what can they do to set themselves apart from the rest. . .handmades, clips, hotshoeing, etc. Maybe even consider a different clientele, moving, expanding area.

    If the phone is ringing steady start going up on all new clients or if you have clients at fairly old rates start bumping them up.

    Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk 2
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    Josh Ramsey Member

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    There's always more work out there, you just have to decide what risk you are willing to take on to get it.

    Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk 2
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    appaloosa 64 New Member

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    I have tried clicking on the reply using this post icon but does not seem to want to work! Any suggestions?
    Josh, in reply I do hot shoe 99.9% of the time unless requested by the client not to (the only way to shoe as far as I am concerned).
    I usually do not have to pull clips as the shoes stay on way to long without them:eek:. As far as handmade shoes go T&H and Rims are the shoes
    used in my part of the world (plates, flat or slicks, depending what you want to call them do not work).
    Other people have posted that clients do not keep to a schedule, ditto, they shoe or trim when they think it is necessary not the horse. From this time of year till September I tell my wife I wish cloning was an option;) !
    1 to shoe, 1 to work at home and 1 to drink beer:LOL: ! As it is I have to get my but off here and out the door as it is a good day lined up. (9 trims, 1 front shoe and possibly a colt cutting:oops:?) We will see how it goes. Yep and I see pushing on the reply to this post icon did not work, Ray or anyone tell me what the heh I am doing wrong or not doing right:unsure:
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Appalossa 64,

    sorry ,i don t know what to tell you bout the reply button, as you can see it worked for me but not because of any special knowledge ,it just did.

    regards

    ray
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    david a hall Moderator

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    I have to say that it seemed to work for both of you. Ask me how I know :)
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    david a hall Moderator

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    May be I'm getting old but I don't want new clients any more!!!!
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    Josh Ramsey Member

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    So you have no clients that you'd like to replace with a better one?

    Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk 2
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    david a hall Moderator

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    How do you define better clients Josh? Because I have shod for the wealthy, the winners and the nice. Some have been all 3 some have been 1 or 2 out of the 3 and some have been none. I am happy with my clients after 35 years of selection, it seems when I take on a new client lately it doesn't take me long to see why they needed a new farrier :)
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    Josh Ramsey Member

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    If you have it so that you don't look at the schedule and think "man I have to do their horses today" then more power to ya.

    To me better would be: better horses, better work conditions, horses always up and ready, let you do your job, pay on time willing to pay premium, value/listen to your advice, respect your personal time.

    Better isn't just rich or high profile. 80% of income comes from 20% of clients and 20% of clients cause 80% of your problems.

    Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk 2
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    david a hall Moderator

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    We do alright Josh...
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    Josh Ramsey Member

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    And in the end that is what matters most.

    Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk 2
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    shoe'em Member

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    I just did a pair of horses that must have had the shoes on (the ones that hadn't come off on their own accord yet) for about a year. What a mess. No wonder some farriers double the price when a guy calls up and wants his horse shod after not calling since the previous year. One horse had plenty of nails stuck in the hoof wall. I broke off some of the nails with my crease nail puller and one nail was broken off where I couldn't see it and i grazed it with my nippers. I didn't have with me at the time a device for shoving one of the nails out of the hoof wall where I could get a hold of it. The hoof wall was dry and brittle. I left the horse for the next day and during the night it rained well enough to soak the feet. What a difference a night of soaking the feet makes. I might insist from now on that people soak their horses' feet before I'll do them. Think that'll work? :)
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    It'll work for the feet, probably not for most of the people - unless it rains the night before.

    Regards
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    Yosemite Gary Pfeiffer

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    I have not posted here because I lost track when the old site got attacked. I finally found you all.

    I'd like the owners to soak the feet before I get there, but save the warm water for my feet when I get done.

    I've been slowing down since I turned 60 a couple of years ago, but my clients have never argued about prices in the 38 years I've been shoeing. When my prices go up ....most say " I was wondering when you'd raise your prices...You are worth every penny."

    I sure like hearing that. I'm in SE Wisconsin and I'm at trims $45, and as full set is $120 keg shoes. I know many are a little higher than me right now, but I'm happy with what I charge.

    Gary

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