Shoe Removal

Discussion in 'Everyday Horseshoeing' started by Cassidy, Mar 5, 2014.

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    Cassidy New Member

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    These shoes stayed on for 9-10 months, I really wish she had kept the farriers name who did the work, impressive!
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    smitty88 Well-Known Member

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    what was impressive?
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    Cassidy New Member

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    That the shoes stayed on for that duration. Definitely not the owner who never organized a farrier during her move..
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    Tejun Member

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    A wise old man told me; if you are measuring your skill by how long your shoes stay on and how fast you can do the horse, you are concentrating on the wrong things.
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    Cassidy New Member

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    That's a great quote and I agree 100%. If this horses hooves were a mess I would not have been so chipper.
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    chris bunting Well-Known Member

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    i dont but a lot of clients do and they are the ones that pay my bills
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Cassidy,

    i m impressed with the hoof condition, as for staying on, i can only guess that some of that has to do with humidity, environment, quality of the original work, and agree with you , not husbandry by the owner,nor work since the last setting. you should get the name of the person who put them on and have them send a "weekly rent" bill to the owner.

    ray
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    gary evans old and slow

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    Not to cast doubt on your post, but since it is generally accepted that the hoof grows from the coronary band to the ground in 10-12 months, that foot is what I would expect to see at around 16 weeks.
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    Cassidy New Member

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    I am quite certain. The hoof wall was weight bearing versus the shoe, and the nails were about 1/4 in. maybe from the bottom of the hoof wall. This is a geriatric horse, whose hooves grow very slow.
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    Gary Hill Active Member

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    I was at a clients today that had got a horse of hers back from the trainer she uses and outside of the feet looked bad, they had the same shoes I nailed on a year ago?? She said that he had his guy reset her horse. The thing is, IF he was riding the horse for a year it should have had quite a few sets of shoes on it? I mark my shoes so I recognized them right off the bat. I told her and she said, "well he didn't really charge me for shoeing her"???????
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    smitty88 Well-Known Member

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    on the other side of the coin I shoe a horse that races on the road.
    every 2/3 weeks he has to be shod
    he does 5 miles on the road a day
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    gary evans old and slow

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    As I said, I didn't mean to doubt you, I was just saying that I would normally expect to see that amount of growth at around 16 weeks.
    Coincidentally, I did this horse today, which I last shod on the 9th of August - so 7 months ago:

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    and just to show how growth rates can vary, I do these two old retired companions and took these pictures 12 weeks after I had last trimmed them:

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    Bill Adams Active Member

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    My record is eleven months. The horse grew about two and a half inches, or about half a hand.
    Gary, I had a client send a mare to be bread and was charged for a shoeing. The shoes hadn't been touched and my client called the breeder who insisted she had been. Said she had seen the shoer working on her and was sure. This breeder runs her whole business like that and has gone belly up.
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    david a hall Moderator

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    People seem to think it's ok to!!!
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    we call those kind of folks, the Memorial Day Parade crowd. I'll see the horses once a yr before the parade they are attending; quite often the horses will still have from 1 to 4 shoes left from the previous annual shoe job. They want it done just like last time 'cause those shoes stayed for the Sept trail ride.
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    Richard K New Member

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    Yeah, and I've been wondering lately what clients are expecting.
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    shoe'em Member

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    Well put! On the other hand; If someone keeps the shoes on a bit too long and the heels come over the shoe and the foot ( a hind) gets a quarter crack on the lateral side (sorry no pic.) , is it the fault of the farrier or the fact that the shoe stayed on too long?
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    Mikel Dawson Active Member

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    "But I thought as long as the shoes were on, it was ok" Heard this once in a while.
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    shoe'em Member

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    The other one is: "I thought they would just fall off."
    Now how about the crack in the heel quarter that occurred while the shoe was on too long? Was it the farriers' fault or just one of those things?

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