ugly hooves

Discussion in 'Everyday Horseshoeing' started by boris, Dec 1, 2014.

  1. Offline

    boris New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Often the new owner buys the horse because he liked it. Then it turns out that in some cases the horse need shoeing. Because of the horse bad conformation she may has ugly hooves and can ingure themselvs when moving. Can I ask for more money for shoeing this horse?
    P.S. I'm from Russia.
  2. Offline

    appaloosa 64 New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    If you have looked at the horse and quoted a price or have already done the job (and realized you should have charged more, been there done that):eek: then I would have to say NO. When I take on a new customer I give them a base price for a standard shoeing, be it fronts or all around (rims or plates). If they want different shoes or corrective work is needed then the customer is charged accordingly. Existing and steady customers realize this but with new customers the work that needs to be done and cost of such work should be discussed before you nail a shoe on. My two cents worth!:)
  3. Offline

    boris New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
  4. Offline

    Bill Adams Active Member

    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Welcome Boris,
    Do you have a lot of steady work where you live? What type of horses do you do.
  5. Offline

    boris New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    in winter not much, in summer a lot of. Back yard horses.
  6. Offline

    ray steele Administrator

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    63

    Boris,

    You can always ask for more money.....................course that doesn t mean that you ll get called back!

    to me, and I realize each business man handles things differently, if it takes me more work and or materials then it costs the customer more,conversely if it takes less time and or materials, i charge less., but I have a base price for my work.

    Ray
  7. Offline

    david a hall Moderator

    Likes Received:
    265
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hey Boris, what is th training process in Russia?
  8. Offline

    boris New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    What do you have in mind, David? More specific please...
  9. Offline

    david a hall Moderator

    Likes Received:
    265
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Sorry, how do you become a farrier in Russia? Is there a structured training programme? Or do you just pick it up ?
  10. Offline

    KyleK Member

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
  11. Offline

    boris New Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    When I was young it so happened that I fell in love with horses. I don't know why but horseshoeing was interesting to me the most. About 20 years ago I went to the USA to visit my friends in Mariland. It was there that I met a farrier from Virginia by the name of Dean Geis. These were my first lessons in shoeing, as it should be. Futher - practice and self-education. A couple of times I was at the AFA Symposium in Cincinnati. What to study in Russia this case, it is not. Many years ago there were military instructors in the cavalry. Now they have already passed away. The skill is passed down from teacher to student.
  12. Offline

    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Dean Geis is a hand. So you got a good start. ;-)

Share This Page

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)