Other wld w/crack from coronet

Discussion in 'Farrier Advice For Horses With Lameness Issues' started by regala, Jun 5, 2014.

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    regala New Member

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    definitely no neurological problems. all tests completely normal. no other issues (other than obvious body soreness due to 6 weeks of being lame, which are dealt with through chiro/accupressure/massage). we are in langley, bc.
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Yea right. And you thought you had a competent farrier too.
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    regala New Member

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    i'm not sure what you are trying to say. clearly she is body sore. she's been lame for 6 weeks and not loading RF or LH. are you suggesting the foot is not the primary issue?

    nowhere did i say i thought i had a competent farrier, i'm not sure where you got that idea.

    i hope i do have now, and you've indicated his work "looks a good job". do you now think the new farrier is incompetent?


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    Pat Reilly Active Member

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    "There was one horse owner who was looking for information on this site recently who received poor information regarding the efficacy of a treatment. I did not respond and that animal is now deceased. I am upset with myself for not pointing out the flaws in the post. That is why I post here, in spite of the insults directed personally or at my skill. I post because I believe it matters."




    i came here hoping to get actual advice that may help the horse.

    thinking perhaps that was unrealistic, but hoping someone else here with the above member's ideology may have or offer other suggestions that may help the mare.

    i'd really like to to what's best for her, and despite all efforts not sure we are.
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    Western Hill Forge Active Member

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    I took Tom's comment as referring to your original farrier. Also, that it is not generally normal for horses to consistently step on themselves. When something is not normal, and is causing a problem, such as the shoe pulling, (which David has pointed out is a HUGE problem when trying to rehab a foot) the cause of that abnormality must be found. If all of the tests were, as you stated, completely normal, perhaps more or different tests to find the problem should be done. Going back a ways, to the X-rays, I would agree with your farrier and vet that the lack of sole depth is a much bigger issue that the angles. Both of these issues can be addressed, IF you can keep the shoes on.

    Regards
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    brian robertson Active Member

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    horses with EPM will inadvertently step on themselves, pulling shoes, when they're somewhat stationary while stalled
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    Stef Member

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    That's what I have been thinking, too - therefore my question in which area the horse lives. Regala, I don't know how the opossum situation is in your area, but if you have them, you will have Sarcocystis, the parasite that can cause EPM. There is a fairly new test kit (the company that produce it is called Prota) which allows you to confirm the exposure to the parasite with a simple blood sample. We managed to get this kit here and confirmed the first official case of Sarcocystis exposure in Mexico 1.5 years ago in one of our horses. It took us more than 2 years to get to this conclusion - it is very hard to recognize at the beginning as the horse showed barely any signs. But he was constantly pulling shoes, refusing to bend to one side and body soreness.For a year we treated for EPM without our vets approval. Once confirmed it was to late. Don't want to raise panic in you, but maybe you can hint your vet into this direction to rule out EPM. Good luck and keep us up to date.
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    chris bunting Well-Known Member

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    kin ell , lose some weight . horse and rider, that would make a good start
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    Interesting how many farriers on this forum think that a horse that chronically steps off the opposite shoe is significantly abnormal and might indicate a neurological problem. At least among the farriers on this forum it would appear this is common knowledge - like something that any professional farrier with some tenure would know and insist on having definitively tested and verified. Kinda goes along with boxing and safing the shoes - especially on a shoe with a crisp edge like concave. It seems abnormal for a farrier to have the skill to build and fit hand made bar shoes and yet neglect the attention to detail required to keep the shoes on the horse. There isn't any rocket science involved, just solid basic farriery principles. Very strange.
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    chris bunting Well-Known Member

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    well said Sir , too much BS and no practical
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    regala New Member

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    thanks to those of you with suggestions. most definitely all vets, farriers, and horse owners i know, are aware of epm or cvm as common knowledge, don't think that's unusual here at all. she tests fine, so don't think that is the issue. if anything changes, can get epm test done by vet.

    farrier says the interference is from crooked leg and flight path/way hoof lands. not sure if he's right about that. i'm guessing the two times it's happened is when she's wingnutting to spinning/stopping. appears to be how she's pulled the shoes.

    any other ideas would be appreciated. i'm a bit confused by your replies tom. don't know why you'd say it was a good job, and then say it's "abnormal" how he shod the mare. i was pretty shocked i got no criticism of the shoeing that was done by current farrier, but thought it was an improvement on previous work, and this farrier is very well recommended in an area with many qualified practitioners. wish those here more knowledgeable than myself would point out specific problems though, particularly with balance, so i'd know what to ask of the farrier/vet.

    also not sure whether you're suggesting it's my fault for improper turnout, a physical issue completely unrelated to the feet, or farrier's fault. not trying to argue, but wanting to understand what the problems are so we can address them.

    chris, i don't understand what you are trying to say at all. what does kin ell mean? and were you saying the horse need to lose weight? i disagree. she's not being ridden now, but her owner/rider weighs under 100lbs. and what is too much "BS"?
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    regala New Member

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    does anyone have opinions on if developing crushed heels with the wedge may be a problem?

    also, the link i posted with pics has several subgroups from that past 6 weeks with/without shoes (bailey sub albums). if anyone has the time to look and give me thoughts on the trim/balance i can take more from this week with new shoes, and hinds. she is improving since then, so hoping we are on the right track, but am concerned about several things still, that i see as being not as they should.

    http://s135.photobucket.com/user/bunnytron/library/bailey?sort=9&page=1
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    Tom Bloomer Well-Known Member

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    At no time in this thread have I opined that either farrier did a "good" job. I said the second farrier did a much better job than the first and that the second farrier needed to work on his skill with the grinder. Since you mentioned it, what are the qualifications of "qualified practitioners" who recommended this farrier? What is the basis of their authority to determine a farrier's qualifications? And if said practitioners are genuinely qualified, then why aren't they the ones shoeing your horse?
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    chris bunting Well-Known Member

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    the photo of the horse i can see is overweight and bs means exactly , too much talk and not enough practical as Tom has pointed out ,the shoeing doesnt look bad
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    ray steele Administrator

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    Rocksie Member

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    With so much hoof gone or split, is there a way to cast it without filling in the gaps and holes? My vet used a casting material on one of ours once that looked like fabric strips. Maybe you could research it, because that one stabilizing strap across the top of her foot doesn't seem like enough, even with the clips.

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